Posts Tagged ‘tax return’

Do you need to fill in a tax return?

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

HMRC have determined that you must complete a self assessment tax return if any of the following circumstances apply to your personal, financial circumstances:

 

1.    You’re a company director, minister, Lloyd’s name or member.

  1. Your annual income is £100,000 or more.
  1. You have income from savings, investment or property.

If you are an employee or a pensioner and already pay tax through a PAYE code, you can sometimes ask for tax that you owe on income, such as savings and property, to be collected through your code number. You’ll need to complete a tax return instead if the income you receive is:

  • £10,000 or more from taxed savings and investments
  • £2,500 or more from untaxed savings and investments
  • £10,000 or more from property (before deducting allowable expenses)
  • £2,500 or more from property (after deducting allowable expenses)

If you don’t pay tax through a PAYE code you’ll need to complete a tax return if all of the following apply:

  • you have income to declare, for example income from savings, trusts or abroad, rental income from land or property
  • your total income exceeds your total allowances and reliefs
  • you have tax to pay on this income
  1. You need to claim expenses or reliefs.
  1. If you or your partner or spouse receives Child Benefit and either of you has income over £50,000.
  1. You get income from overseas.
  1. You have income from trusts, settlements or estates.
  1. You have Capital Gains Tax to pay.
  1. You’ve lived or worked abroad or aren’t domiciled in the UK.
  1. You’re a trustee.

Quite a list…

One benefit of submitting a return is an automatic reconciliation of your overall tax position for the tax years affected.

For those tax payers that are not required to submit a tax return, and who have a number of income streams – all taxed at source – HMRC should send you a tax calculation at least once a year, showing your various income sources, tax paid and any balance of tax owing or due back to you.

Whichever situation applies to your circumstances take care to check HMRC’s calculations, either yourself or by seeking professional advice, HMRC do not always get it right.

 

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